The company has built the LEX L11 for use on broadband networks around the world, including FirstNet in the US and has designed it specifically for the demanding environments experienced by first responders. It can be paired with an APX P25 two-way radio, allowing users to communicate covertly on their radio while using the LEX L11 The device has a dedicated push-to-talk button, a dedicated emergency button, and a dedicated talkgroup rocker switch, along with two programmable buttons. Both standard and high battery options are available and its batteries are field-swappable and support fast charging.

The LEX L11 (shown right) has also been designed so that it will continue to run after multiple drops onto concrete from a height of four feet (121 cm) and is IP67 rated for dust and water intrusion allowing it to function after being immersed in water at a depth of one metre for 30 minutes.

The new Capture app allows users to capture video and audio evidence with the LEX L11 or Android and iOS-based smartphones, which is then automatically uploaded to Motorola Solutions’ CommandCentral Vault digital evidence management solution for storage and later use.

Motorola Solutions claims that from the moment of capture, the evidence is protected from tampering and that the chain of evidence is verifiable, removing the need for devices to be subpoenaed. Metadata is added automatically to allow the evidence to be organised within CommandCentral Vault.

The APX 8500HP is a high-power version of Motorola Solutions’ interoperable all-band Project 25 (P25) mobile radio. The radio has a a maximum output power of 100 watts and the company claims that this makes it idea for use in rural areas or during disaster response where limited infrastructure might be available. The company also says that the APX 8500HP's all-band functionality means that first responders from different agencies can easily communicate with each other, regardless of the frequency band they are using.